Collection Artwork
Tim Rollins and K.O.S. (South Bronx, New York, established 1981)
Winterreise (songs XX-XXIV) (after Schubert)
1988
acrylic and mica on music pages mounted on linen
installed size: 12 x 132 in.
panel size, each: 12 x 8 3/4 x 7/8 in.
Gift of Ruth and William S. Ehrlich
2012.18a-l
No marks. Backs of each panel reviewed Aug. 4, 2017, by Rebecca McNamara

Installation views

Object Label

A rejected and lovelorn wanderer, in a state of existential questioning, seeks inner truth in Winterreise (“Winter Journey”), a song cycle by early 19th-century Viennese composer Franz Schubert. In this work by Tim Rollins and K.O.S., we walk alongside the wanderer through the final six songs of the cycle. We begin with transparency, perhaps even clarity, but our journey tapers into opaque whiteness when we reach the ultimate song, Der Leiermann (“The Hurdy- Gurdy Man”), in the last two panels. There, in the ice and snow, the wanderer meets a hurdy- gurdy player, an elderly beggar playing for no one but himself—for no one else cares to see or hear him.

Does he offer hope, the inspiration to carry on, or is he a final, hallucinatory sign of the wanderer’s imminent death? Tim Rollins and K.O.S. seek hope and therefore present a tabula rasa, a blank slate from which to journey anew; but as snowfall covers the song, notions of disappearance and loss cannot be avoided. In sadness and despair, is there promise for new, greater possibilities?

From the exhibition: Other Side:
Art, Object, Self (August 12, 2017 – January 3, 2018)

Ongoing Research

Research on our collection is ongoing. If you have resources you’d like to share, please contact Associate Curator Rebecca McNamara.

Learn more

Other Side:
Art, Object, Self
Exhibition
Tim Rollins and K.O.S. on Winterreise (songs XX-XXIV) (after Schubert)
Video
Sarah Day-O'Connell on Seminar as Schubertiad
Essay
i
Pattern by Abby Fuess ’18
Inspired by the exhibition Other Side: Art, Object, Self
The Tang Pattern Project celebrates the Museum’s 20th anniversary. Organized by Head of Design Jean Tschanz-Egger, past and current Tang Design Interns created patterns inspired by the Museum’s exhibition and event history.