Collection Artwork
Two Black girls pose with their hands on their hips in front of an ice cream shop with an illuminated sign that reads “Lady D’s 3 Faith 88 Lunch.”
Two Black girls pose with their hands on their hips in front of an ice cream shop with an illuminated sign that reads “Lady D’s 3 Faith 88 Lunch.”
Two Black girls pose with their hands on their hips in front of an ice cream shop with an illuminated sign that reads “Lady D’s 3 Faith 88 Lunch.”
Two Black girls pose with their hands on their hips in front of an ice cream shop with an illuminated sign that reads “Lady D’s 3 Faith 88 Lunch.”
Dawoud Bey (born New York, New York, 1953)
Two Young Girls in Front of Lady D's [from Harlem, U.S.A.]
1976, printed 2017
gelatin silver print
image size: 8 x 11 7/8 in.
paper size: 10 7/8 x 13 7/8 in.
mat size: 16 x 20 in.
frame size: 16 5/8 x 20 5/8 x 1 1/2 in.
The Jack Shear Collection of Photography at the Tang Teaching Museum
Harlem, New York, New York, United States, North America
2017.40.4
2/10
Inscribed by artist in pencil, verso, lower left: 2/10
Signed and dated in pencil, verso, lower right: Dawoud Bey 1976/2017
Inscribed in pencil, verso, center right, along edge: 663.663.3.17

Installation views

Object Labels

If I can make work that begins to transcend difference while locating a common humanity that we all share, a radical reshaping of the world is possible, one person at a time.
—Dawoud Bey

Dawoud Bey’s 1970s photographs of Harlem present a moment and place, but in ways that reflect many moments, many places. Harlem, U.S.A., he calls the series: this, Harlem, is the United States.

Together, the images offer glimpses of the specific everyday lives of people while evoking the diversity of a neighborhood. Bey’s photographs, like Zanele Muholi’s at left, fight stereotyping by celebrating individuality.

From the exhibition: Give a damn. (June 30 – September 30, 2018)

“Driving through the crowded streets, I was amazed by what appeared to be the many people on vacation. It seemed to me that no matter what the day, every day was Saturday in Harlem.” —Dawoud Bey

From the exhibition: Where Words Falter: Art and Empathy (July 9 – December 18, 2022)

Ongoing Research

Research on our collection is ongoing. If you have resources you’d like to share, please contact Associate Curator Rebecca McNamara.
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