Elevator Music 30
Critter & Guitari

Critter & Guitari’s founders, Owen Osborn and Chris Kucinski, met at Skidmore College in 1998, where Kucinski studied art and Osborn studied physics and music. They began making music together in college and their fascination with sound, technology, materials, and design has taken them down numerous creative avenues: producing interactive sculptures, developing commercial electronics kits, and designing museum exhibitions. Currently, they create a line of electronic instruments, which are portable, versatile, and provide a platform for musical and creative exploration. Each of their brightly colored instruments is designed to encourage experimentation with different ways of making sounds. As one journalist wrote, “You’re not sitting down to play Bach — you’re gonna make some weird noises.” Every instrument is assembled and tested by Osborn and Kucinski in their studio in Brooklyn, NY.
The installation in the Tang’s elevator features a variety of Critter & Guitari instruments with playful names like Bolsa Bass and Kaleidoloop. Some of these are connected to each other, and some are connected to the three monitors. At the back of the elevator are two multi-colored objects, early experiments that combine video and sound manipulation within the same instrument. Critter & Guitari’s work is about discovery, exploration, and play, so come in, push buttons, turn knobs, and twist dials!
Exhibition Name
Elevator Music 30
Critter & Guitari
Exhibition Type
Solo Exhibitions
Elevator Music Series
Place
Elevator
Dates
Feb 06, - Aug 07,
Curators
Elevator Music 30: Critter & Guitari is organized by Rachel Seligman, Assistant Director for Curatorial Affairs, in collaboration with the artists. This exhibition is supported by Friends of the Tang.
Artists
Critter & Guitari
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